How to write an outstanding staff profile, help writing staff profile, professional staff profile writer

How to write an outstanding staff profile

Knowing how to write an outstanding staff profile can be challenging – particularly if you’re trying to write about yourself.

The purpose of a profile is to tell a little of your story, to encourage readers to relate to you, and to nurture what we call the “know, like & trust factor”.  Most people want to know who they’re dealing with, and get to know, like and trust you before they commit to doing business with you. This is particularly true for service businesses and higher cost products.

Other than detailing what you do, how you do it, where you do it and what your specialties are, your profile should include any major achievements, awards and successes you’ve experienced.

For many of us, it can be difficult to say good things, to celebrate our successes and tout our accomplishments. While for others, these are things they’re always ready to shout from the nearest rooftop!

If, like most of us, you’re in the first group, fear not! Here are

Here are 5 top tips on how to write an outstanding staff profile:

1. Find a buddy 

Ask a colleague or friend to interview you. Set out a list of questions and ask them to note your answers. This might sound silly, but the process of being interviewed can bring out information you may not have otherwise divulged (only if you want to!).

2.  Hers or mine?

Should one write in the first person or third person – that is “I” versus “Tom”? For an outstanding staff profile, it is advisable to ALWAYS use the third person. The reason is that, when we’re told something good about an individual or business, we tend to believe a “neutral” third party’s opinion over and above the individual themselves. This is just human nature. The words “I” and “my can sound self-important and pretentious in a profile, which doesn’t encourage the reader to know, like and trust you.

Which of the following statements do you find more believable and likable?

“Tom demonstrates a passion and enthusiasm for property. He is known for his dedication to incredible customer service and strong focus on achieving the best possible results for his valued clients”.

“I demonstrate a passion and enthusiasm for property. I am known for my dedication to incredible customer service and I have a strong focus on achieving the best possible results for my valued clients”.

3. Use everyday language

Think about your reader and write for them. Use terms they will be familiar with, rather than too much technical language or jargon.

Be sure to check for spelling, punctuation and grammar mistakes – these are so very easy to make and overlook. Ask someone else to proofread your document before you publish it, and be sure to make any corrections.

4. Include a recent photo 

It’s surprising how many people don’t have their photo on their profile. People do business with people, so they want to know what you look like. This goes back to the whole know, like and trust factor you’re trying to build.

Invest in using a professional photographer, as they have good lighting and will advise you on various angles which may suit you face shape or the image you wish to portray. If possible, smile in the photo. You don’t have to look like the Cheshire Cat, but you do want to look friendly and approachable. Your photo and profile should make your prospects want to pick up the phone and call you.

5. Toot your horn, but not too loudy! 

This can be a bit tricky. It’s also where a professional writer can be of great value. You should mention if you’ve won an award, achieved great sales figures, topped your class at University or have any other significant achievements. However, it’s easy to come across as being an overachiever if you have more than a few, and you need to be careful not to sound conceited as well.

Writing in the third person can help, or simply stating the name and year the award was won. Using bullet points, rather than elaborate paragraphs can also assist with simply stating the achievement, while not “bragging too much”.

For example:

  • Winner – Sales Achiever of the Year, Excel Sales Company, 2015

Another tip is to keep your achievements relevant to your audience. If you won an award in a previous job, and you’ve changed direction in your career, or if you won something at school and you’ve been out in the workforce for more than ten years, the award may not be worth mentioning.

One final tip …

As with any type of writing, it’s a good idea to get someone else to read your profile before you publish it – whether it’s in print or online. If possible, find a person who doesn’t know you well, ask them to read your profile, and then ask them what kind of assumptions they made about you based on the information they read in your profile. Ask for open, honest feedback because you want your profile to portray the best possible image of you while also being accurate! Ask them if they think you’ve an outstanding staff profile – or not.

It can be hard to write about yourself – especially the good stuff! Sometimes it’s easier to get a third party to write your profile for you. If you need expert help in putting together an outstanding staff profile, I’d be happy to help. You’ll find more information about my staff profile writing services, together with some samples of profiles I’ve written. If you’d like to speak to me personally, please email me with your requirements.

 

Hi, I’m Lyndall Guinery-Smith, The Professional Writer. I have a strong background in small business management and I love to write copy which attracts and engages your customers – improving your bottom line. I happily work with clients all around Australia. Email me to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

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How getting to know your clients can help you win more business

Does your marketing help bring in truckloads of new clients? Would you like to get more engagement from your customers and win more business?

Think about your marketing messages: Do you actually know who you are targeting? If you said “everyone”, you ‘re probably wasting valuable time and money chasing the wrong crowd. Instead of trying to market to everyone with generic messages, you’re more likely to see results if you narrow your focus and target a specific group of clients. To achieve this, your marketing message needs to resonate with your audience, as if you are speaking directly to the individual, which motivates them to buy from you. You want your prospect to read your marketing and say “Yes, that’s me you’re talking to. I need your help. I’m ready to buy from you!”

Why Identify your Ideal Clients?

By getting clear on who your ideal clients are, you can communicate value to them, making their purchasing decision less about price and more about how you can help solve their problem. This makes them a hot prospect, who is more likely to be ready to buy.

So, who is your ideal client and how do you target them? You can start by creating an Ideal Client Profile (ICP).

What is an Ideal Client Profile?

An ICP is the collation of detailed information about your ideal clients, such as their wants, needs and habits. This information will help you to address the clients “pain points”, with the aim of increasing engagement and sales. It can also enable you to identify and work with a specific group of people who you want to work with, and can help you to develop future products or services which directly serve their needs.

You can just start with a basic profile, which can be revised and updated on an ongoing basis.

How to gather the information

If you have an established business, you can ask your customers for their information through a survey – either in person or online. There are several free online tools, such as Survey Monkey or Survey Planet, which are ideal for this purpose.

You can also take a close look at your top 10 clients – the ones who bring in the most income and/or who you prefer to deal with. Do they share common attributes, such as location, profession, interests or marital status? How did they become your client – did you pursue them, did they come to you or were they referred to you?

If your business is new, think of a friend or a number of people who epitomise the type of clients you want to work with. Create an imaginary person from a combination of these traits.

What you may need to ask

The information you need to know will vary between businesses. Make a list of things you believe are important to you and your interaction with clients from the prompts below.

  • What are their wants, needs, interests, fears, concerns, desires, hopes, dreams, motivations, short and long term goals, challenges, problem to solve?
  • What keeps them awake at night?
  • What do they expect from your company and your product or service?
  • How are they using your product?
  • What do they like/dislike about your product or service?
  • What is your point of difference in their eyes?
  • What influences their buying decisions?
  • What influences them to favour one product or service over another?
  • How much time do they have available to research and make a purchasing decision?
  • What are their demographics? Age, gender, income, marital status, job, level of education, life stage, etc.
  • Describe their behaviour – likes, dislikes, sports, hobbies, etc.
  • Location – where do they live, work, spend weekends
  • What do they read – online / offline
  • What do they search online?

Include any other questions or information which is relevant to your business.

Once you’ve gathered all the information, you can compile your ICP. Depending on your range of products or services, you may need multiple ICPs. Set out an individual profile for each of them, giving them a fictitious name, together with a profile photo (online photo libraries are ideal for this), and a detailed description.

Targeting your Ideal Clients

Now that you know who you’re targeting, you can create a specific marketing initiative which addresses the needs of your ideal client. This will have a stronger impact than any generic campaign ever could.

Your new marketing message could address the ICP’s pain points or a problem they wish to solve, it can express how your product or service can help the client and provide a specific call to action which speaks directly to them.

Ideally, your ideal clients will have common interests, problems and challenges to overcome. When this is the case, your business is able to be very precise in addressing the customer’s needs and can quickly become known as an expert in your particular niche.

By targeting your ideal clients, you’re much more likely to engage with them and, in turn, you greatly increase your chances to win more business!

 

Hi, I’m Lyndall Guinery-Smith, The Professional Writer. I have a strong background in small business management and I love to write copy which attracts and engages your customers – improving your bottom line. I happily work with clients all round Australia. Email me to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

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How to make your Company Profile stand out

Once you’ve made the decision to prepare a Company Profile, or update your old one, you need to take some time to think about the content. Yes, there are standard formats you can follow, which provide details of your company, what you do and how you do it.

Can I suggest you take a slight different approach?

Sure, you need to include information about your company – that’s what the document is for. But it’s also important to consider why the potential client is reading your Company Profile. What does he or she want to know?  It goes without saying that they want to know who you are and what you do, but what they REALLY want to know is … WHAT’S IN IT FOR THEM!

One big mistake many small businesses make when putting together their Company Profile is that they rehash the Company History, throw in something about products or services, then tack the contact details on the end. OK, this may not be your approach, but we’ve all seen this type of profile, and it’s missing the opportunity to connect with the potential client.

If you want your Company Profile to stand out, you need to build rapport with the reader and clearly demonstrate how you solve their problem or address their needs. This will help your profile to capture the reader’s attention much more readily and will complement the standard information on your company.

Here’s an example …

Let’s say you’re a builder. OK, we know you construct homes, but it’s more than that – you help clients bring their dream home to reality.

So let’s talk about their needs. But what are they?

Listen to what your clients ask for –

  • Do they want minimal contact or regular communication?
  • Premium quality, value for money or the cheapest price?
  • Is working to a timeline or schedule important?
  • Are qualifications and industry standards important?

One of the best ways to demonstrate how you meet your customer’s needs is to use the Mission Statement section of your Company Profile. You Mission Statement can portray the values of your organisation and reinforce exactly how you go about meeting the needs of your clients.

One important point – don’t say you do something if you have no intention of following through. At least some of your values must be a genuine match with the values of the client if you’re going to successfully do business together.

Other ways to set your profile apart include:

Company Profile, Professional Writer

Sample Company Profile Cover page

  • Use graphics or a striking image on the cover – not just your company logo. If your budget allows, use a graphic designer to produce a quality front page for your profile.
  • Use colour – most Company Profiles are just black and white, colour adds life and attracts the reader’s eye.
  • Use images to illustrate your products, show off your work and introduce your team – Connect with your potential customers and build rapport by using photos of your team, your premises and perhaps add photos of your clients next to their testimonials (this adds credibility to their comments). If you’re using photos of your staff, be sure to add a caption with their name underneath. This is a good way to help people “put a face to the name”, especially if you’re not dealing with them face-to-face. Images also help to add interest to the page and break up the text.
  • Include a Contents page, headlines and sub-headings – Make it easy for your reader to find the information they’re looking for my using a Table of Contents to direct them, plus headlines and sub-headings which separate content and make it easy to read.

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    Social network icons and stickers vector set

  • Include and DOUBLE CHECK your Contact Details – this may seem obvious, but please make sure you include ALL your contact details. Double check the phone number and email address are correct – this is VITAL. How do your clients contact you now? If you’re active on social media, you may want to include links to these pages, but only if you check your page or feed regularly and will respond to the client via this medium. If you’re not currently active, just use your phone number and email address.

If you’d more about Company Profile tips – check out the article: How to write a Company Profile that wins more business on this blog.

Do you have any Company Profile tips which have worked for you or your company? Please feel free to share via the comment box below.

 

Hi, I’m Lyndall Guinery-Smith, The Professional Writer. I have a strong background in small business management and actually enjoy writing Company Profiles (as crazy as that sounds!).

I love to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line. I happily work with clients all round Australia. Email me to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

Get red hot testimonials

How to get RED HOT testimonials from your clients

I was talking to my client Robyn recently and she commented how much she enjoys getting testimonials. Heck, we all LOVE a happy client! Robyn wanted to use some testimonials in her new Company Profile, but she wanted to know how she could make her client’s testimonials sound even more RED HOT, to say more than ‘she did a great job’ or ‘she’s a lovely person’ … without ‘editing’ them herself (that’s a big no-no!).

Robyn said she wanted the words to come from her clients, but wasn’t sure how to ask them without offending them. I made the following suggestions…

  • State it upfront – When you’re romancing a new client, tell them your business is based on referrals from happy clients and that you will be asking him/her for a brief testimonial on completion of the sale or service. This puts them on notice that your service better be good because you’ll obviously be looking for a positive testimonial
  • Deliver great service under promise and over deliver – be deserving of a great testimonial
  • Invite them to be part of your tribe Everyone likes to belong and feel accepted as part of a group or tribe. Create a client club, entice them to join your email list or invite them to a client function. Ask them if you can keep them updated with regular discount/special offers – make it sound interesting and useful. That way, you’re more likely to get their repeat business.
  • Make them feel valued – Remind them that you value their feedback and ask them to be completely honest
  • Important guidelines Develop a list of questions to guide the client when writing the testimonial, for example:
    • What objections (if any) did you need to overcome before you bought this product? i.e. price, delivery, etc. (tailor this to your product/service)
    • What problem did the product/service solve for you?
    • What benefits did you find after using this product/service?
    • You’re happy to recommend us because…
  • Why the list? The most convincing testimonials demonstrate how the client’s objection was overcome or how your product/service solved their problem. Future prospects relate best to this type of statement
  • Offer a helping hand – If your client is happy to provide a testimonial but is unsure what to write, offer to write it for them. No, this is not dishonest – you must use THEIR words. Ask them some questions about the problem/s you solved for them and record their comments, then use this as your testimonial. HOWEVER, before displaying the testimonial, you MUST send it to the client and give them the opportunity to edit it as much as they like.  You may also consider asking them to sign off on the final copy and keep it on file, just to cover yourself.
  • Don’t wait On completion of the transaction, ask them for the testimonial. Don’t wait. Ask while the product or service is fresh in your client’s mind. Did I mention, don’t wait??!
  • Make them feel valued – Yes, I’m repeating this heading – because it’s so important if you want to receive a RED HOT testimonial. Try telling them, ‘We’d love to feature your testimonial on our blog!’… then they really become part of your tribe. Offer to link the testimonial to their website if they’re a business, and let them know you’re helping their Google ranking too.

I’ll be checking back with Robyn to see how many RED HOT testimonials she’s received.

Why not try this out yourself – and please email me with your success stories – I LOVE good news!!

Or, if you’d like to promote your business with a new Company Profile, I’m happy to help – please contact me for a quote.

 

Hi, I’m Lyndall Guinery-Smith, The Professional Writer. I have a strong background in Real Estate and small business management. I love to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

I happily work with clients all round Australia. Email me to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

Hire A Professional Writer, Engaging Company Profile, The Professional Writer, Company Profile writer, How to write a company profile

How to write a Company Profile that wins business

An engaging Company Profile is a great way to truly connect with prospective customers – and get them to buy from you. It can also help you to portray a professional image, help to establish rapport, build trust and reinforce your brand.

While it’s tempting to produce a document which looks bright and shiny, it’s more important to ensure you get the content right first. Most people will see straight through a Company Profile which is full of glossy photos and little wording – unless you’re promoting your services as a photographer or printer!

Who’s reading your Company Profile?

Think about the reader first – your Company Profile needs to make a connection with them.

  • Who is our intended reader?
  • How much time will they have to read our Company Profile?

Think about what they want to know and adjust your content accordingly

A lot of businesses simply prepare their Company Profile based on standard guidelines, without thinking about the needs of the reader. The contents are often based on assumptions about what prospective clients want to know, rather than facts. Before you go ahead with preparing your document, you need to ascertain exactly, “What do our prospective clients truly want to know about us?”

First timers

If you don’t already have a Company Profile, talk to your current clients, friends and/or family. Ask them what questions they have about your products or services, and what barriers they have, if any, to buying from you. This will help you decide what needs to be included in your Company Profile. Once you’ve drafted the document, give it to those people to read, then ask whether they feel they would be in a position to make a purchasing decision after reading it. Use this information to add to or edit your Company Profile.

Updating your current profile

If you already have a Company Profile, ask a few trusted clients for their honest feedback on the current document, paying attention to the feedback and questions you get when people read it. Also, think about the questions you are most frequently asked by prospective customers.  These questions point to issues you’ll need to address when you update your document.

For example, if you are a company which supplies products or services to busy small business owners, who are very often extremely time-poor, your Company Profile will need to be concise and get straight to the point. You may need to consider using more bullet points and shorter, more concise paragraphs. Whereas a Company Profile for a business who supplies products or services to government or the corporate sector may need to contain much more detailed information. However, both types of documents still require a great deal of care in their preparation.

Use images

A lot of companies don’t use images in their Company Profile, and this is really a missed opportunity. If you’re profiling the business owner and/or key staff members, include a small photo of the person next to their profile. That way, the client can put a face to the name, which helps to build rapport.

You may also consider including a photo of your business premises, if appropriate.

Photos of your leading products or your recent work can also be included. The inclusion of good quality photos can help differentiate your business from your competitors.

Reinforce your brand

There’s no better place to reinforce your brand than in your Company Profile. Your Mission and Core Values Statements can be used to outline and reinforce what your business is about and confirm what you stand for.

Don’t forget to use your logo and company colours. This will ensure that all your branding is uniform and help to portray a more professional image.

The bottom line

While your Company Profile will contain a great deal of information about your organisation, if you want to win more business, it needs to be written with the reader in mind. The document must answer the questions of the reader in order to establish rapport, build trust and compel them to buy from you. A well-written Company Profile, which contains all the relevant information your potential client needs to make an informed decision will greatly assist you in winning more business.

For more Company Profile tips, check out: How to make your Company Profile stand out and 7 top tips for a winning Company Profile – from a professional on this blog.

 

Hi, I’m Lyndall Guinery-Smith, The Professional Writer. I have a strong background in small business management and actually enjoy writing Company Profiles (as crazy as that sounds!).

I love to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line. I happily work with clients all round Australia. Email me to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

 

Write About Us page, About Us pages, how to write an about us page

How to write the best About Us page for your site – Top 5 tips

Do you want to win more business? Take a close look at the About page of your website. Does the page provide the information your customers are looking for, or is it a boring re-hash of your Company History?

Whether you realise it or not, your About page isn’t really about you, it’s about your customers, and getting them to know, like and trust you. If you want to capture their attention, and their business, you first need to tell them how you can solve their problem, then back it up with the reasons why you can do this.

Following are my Top 5 tips to write a winning About Us page for your site:

1.  Before you start writing, consider your customer

Think about:

  • Who is my customer?
  • What problem do I/can I solve for them?
  • What does the customer want to know about our company/me?
  • What voice or style do they respond to? i.e. formal or more friendly/casual?

If you’re unsure of the answers to these questions, ask your customers.

2.  Tell them HOW you help solve their problem

Make a clear and concise statement about what you do for your customers. This gets their interest and provides motivation to read on.

3.  Tell them WHY you are the best choice

Here’s your opportunity to make them want to deal with you by expressing your personality, being informative and entertaining, as well as conveying your company’s culture and values. This enables you to engage them with your personal and/or company’s story and to build trust.

You can then include the qualifications and experience you have to back up your claims. Highlight your expertise – accomplishments, awards, volunteer or charity work, associations, education, passion, links to media/press articles you’ve features in, tell them why you do what you do so well.

4.  Express your point of difference

Remember your reader is most likely looking your competitor’s sites as well, so it’s important to clearly state your UVP (Unique Value Proposition – or what makes you stand out from your competitors) on your About page. Research your competitor’s sites to ensure yours stands out.

Simply expressing your story and humanising your organisation can be your point of difference too. People want to know who you are, what you stand for and why they should trust you. It’s important to be honest, authentic and real in order to be trustworthy.

5.  Show your face

Personally, I much prefer to deal with an organisation where I can see photos or video on the Home page or About page. Displaying a photo or video provides a further opportunity for people to get to know, like and trust you. Whether you use individual shots or a team picture, it is essential that you include pictures.

One more tip

Invite them to connect with you on social networking sites such as Facebook, LinkedIn or Google+. That way, they have the opportunity to get to know you before they give you their business.

Should you be feeling a little overwhelmed about writing your About Us page (or any other web page), engaging the services of a Professional Writer can often save you time, money and heartache. Feel free to email me to discuss your project – I’d be happy to assist.

If you’d like to receive more writing tips, please connect with me on Facebook or sign up to the newsletter on my Professional Writer website.

And lastly … I’d love to know – what do you think makes a great About Us page?  Please comment below.

 

Lyndall Guinery-Smith is The Professional Writer. She loves to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

Lyndall has a strong background in Real Estate and is a specialist Property Copywriter. She happily works with clients all round Australia. Email her to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

Help writing business article

Top 10 ideas for writing business articles

When you sit down to write an article for your company’s newsletter or blog, do you struggle to find ideas? Stop wasting your valuable time. Try one or more of the following tips from the toolkit of a Professional Writer.

1. Look at your FAQs What are the questions most frequently asked by your customers? Make a list and answer then. If you don’t already have an FAQ section on your website, the information you gather could form the basis of an FAQ page, as well as inspire an article on one or more of the questions.

2. Tell them what they don’t know For example, you could write, “10 things you need to know before selling your home”.  A title such as this often draws attention, as most people want to be sure they know as much as they can about a particular topic – especially when selling a home!

3. “How to” articlesRelate the article to one of your most popular products or services. Share the information you usually give to customers when they purchase from you, and add a little bit more if you can. This builds confidence in your prospects and may also reinforce your relationship with current customers.

4. Tap into your testimonials Hopefully you’ll already have some statements from happy customers. You can build an article around these, for example, “How we helped Bob catch a record-breaking fish”.

5. New products or services People often enjoy reading about innovative products or services. Be sure to detail how this can improve their life, for example, “How a revolutionary new printer cartridge helped business save 50% on their stationery bill”.

6. Interviews – Profile a trusted customer or top employee, detailing what they like most about your organisation, how you’ve helped them or the importance of their role in your business.

7. Current trendsLook at what’s going on in your industry or the wider business community at the moment. Is there a trend that people want or need to know more about?

8. Think about the season Whether it’s Christmas, Easter or Valentine’s Day, you can often find a way to link a product or service to the occasion. For example, “Top 10 quick and easy Christmas lunch ideas”.

9. Link to events – There are so many events throughout the year that you could link your product or service to, for example, “Top 6 training tips for your fun run”, or “How to have the best experience at Big Day Out”. Just take care not to detract from any charity events.

10. Share your experience – Think about some of the important lessons you’ve learned during your time in business. For example, you could write about, “What I learned in my first year in business” or “What I wish I’d known before I ran a marathon”.

I hope these prompts have got you thinking about writing your next business article. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to email me.

Still got “writer’s block”? Try this.

Hi, I’m Lyndall Guinery-Smith, The Professional Writer. I love to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

I have a strong background in Real Estate and I’m a specialist Property Copywriter. I also enjoy writing Company Profiles and Social Media/Blog content for all types of businesses, and happily work with clients all round Australia. Email me to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

 

Overcome writers block

The surefire solution to blog or newsletter writer’s block

Do you struggle to come up with content for your company Blog, eNews or print newsletter? You’re not alone. Whether you produce your newsletter weekly, monthly, quarterly or occasionally, the most common complaint amongst newsletter compilers is finding inspiration or knowing what to ‘fill it up with’.

Are you guilty of simply grabbing whatever you can find at the last minute, throwing it together and just sending the newsletter out? Unfortunately, this often results in boring your customers with meaningless drivel, or worse still, with customers seeing your newsletter as irrelevant and not even reading it – which is probably not the outcome you were hoping for!

Don’t despair! There’s one secret weapon most professionals use to ensure they always have a choice of quality information ready to use in each and every newsletter…. it’s… THE SWIPE FILE!

What’s a swipe file, I hear you ask? Well, it can be an actual folder or a folder on your computer, where you keep copies of articles from magazines, newspapers and website,s as well as story ideas, pictures or any information which may inspire a future article for your newsletter. Naturally, it goes without saying that if you wish to reproduce another person’s writing, you need to check on copyright issues. You’ll find most people are happy to have their work reproduced if you include their name, a bio/snippet of info about them (often found at the base of their original article) and a link back to their site or the location of the original article, but you need to get their permission to reproduce their work first.

If you’re confident in your own writing ability, you might prefer to take one aspect of the snipped article and expand upon that point in your own article. You can quote from the first article to reinforce your point.

Providing quality articles which are of interest to your customers helps to establish trust and builds your profile in their eyes. Make Writer’s Block a thing of the past… Start your swipe file today – I’m confident it will be a big help when you compile your next newsletter. If you’re already using a swipe file – share your tips and hints with us by leaving a reply in the comment box below.

 

Lyndall Guinery-Smith is The Professional Writer. She loves to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

Lyndall has a strong background in Real Estate and is a specialist Property Copywriter. She happily works with clients all round Australia. Email her to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

Powerful story, About Us page, Writing for business, business story, Professional Writer, how to tell your business story, small business marketing, Lyndall Guinery-Smith

Inspire your customers with a powerful story

We all know how important it is to make a connection with customers in business today. Smart businesses create brand awareness and influence both prospects and customers by involving them in their story. Think about companies such as Apple computers, Boost Juice or Red Balloon Days … all have built prominent profiles based on their culture and unique story. There are thousands more companies who’ve done the same thing in their own industry or marketplace.

A powerful story:

  • creates intimacy
  • establishes relationships
  • creates a shared experience
  • provides a sense of connection
  • communicates your values

A powerful story can motivate, persuade and inspire your prospects, turning them into customers – and increasing your bottom line. If you wish to influence others, you must have a good story.

What particular chapter of your own personal story will your target market best relate to?

For example, if you’re a property marketer targeting first-time investors, you might tell your own personal story of how you bought your first property and how you went on to build a portfolio of dozens of investment properties.

Shaping your story

In order to shape your story, you need to be clear on who you are and what your purpose is.

  • What are you passionate about?
  • Why did you go into business?
  • What are your core values?
  • What do you specialise in?
  • What do you, personally, and/or your business stand for?
  • Are you connected with any charity work?
  • What common interest do you have with your customers?

You don’t have to be able to answer every one of the above questions, but answering at least some of them will give you an idea of your own unique story. If you’re unsure, you may need to work with a friend or coach to discover some answers.

Lyndall Guinery-Smith is The Professional Writer. She loves to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

Lyndall has a strong background in Real Estate and is a specialist Property Copywriter. She happily works with clients all around Australia. Email her to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

5 quick tips for article success

OK – so you’re keen to get an article published in your industry magazine, online journal or local newspaper. Most publications are happy to accept article submissions from your small business – as long as you have an interesting angle!   So, what’s the key to success?

Following are 5 quick tips to help you write an article the editor will love… and want to publish!

1 – Who’s your target market?

Let’s say you’re a freelance make-up artist. Your target market might be teenage girls who want professional makeup for their formal /graduation or young women who are potential brides, as well as their mothers.

If you coach kids after school, you’d target working parents who need help with getting their kids’ homework done or parents looking to improve their children’s academic results.

 2 – Where is your article being published?

Your story needs to capture the attention of this specific target audience. What type of publications or online media is your target market reading?  Approach these publications first.

If you’re really struggling to find an angle which fits your business, your target audience and the publication, you may need to approach a different publication.

3 – What does your audience want to know?

Consider what type of information your audience is looking for. What can you say that will elevate you to the level of expert in your field and influence them to call/email you to make an appointment or purchase your products? Think about the questions you frequently answer for your customers. Offer helpful information in your article –  they’ll want more.

4 – Keep it simple

Choose one angle per story. If your first story is of interest, there’s most likely going to be opportunities for further articles in the future, so save the other topics for later – or another publication.

5 – What’s your best angle?

Consider these potential angles as a starting point –

  • Is your business innovative or the first of its type in your community?
  • What specific problem do you solve for your clients?
  • How does your product/service help enhance client’s lives?
  • Do your products/services help clients save or make money?
  • Have you recently been nominated for, or preferably WON an award?
  • What’s your personal story/background – what led you to start the business?
  • Can you tie your business into something which is a current media issue?
  • What’s your point of difference? What’s your Unique Selling Proposition?
  • Listen to your current customers – why have they come to you and how have you helped them – Incorporate testimonials from your current and/or past clients to reinforce the point you are making. Testimonials are very powerful, but you must seek permission to publish the name and suburb of each person providing them.