Company profile mistakes to avoid, Company profile tips, How to write a Company profile, Professional Writer

7 Company Profile Mistakes to Avoid

mpany Profile mistakes can easily be avoided with a little planning and attention to detail. Whether you’re writing a fresh Company Profile or updating an existing document, there are a few mistakes which a lot of people are making without realising it. Correcting these mistakes can mean the difference between the reader throwing your profile in the bin and securing their business.

Mistake no. 1 – Not considering your audience

The first question you need to ask before writing a Company Profile is “Who am I writing this document for?”  Who are our existing customers? Who are our ideal customers? What are their expectations regarding the length of the document, particular details contained in it, formal vs informal tone, etc.

You wouldn’t write a Company Profile aimed at high-flying corporates in the same way you would write one aimed at tradespeople. Why? Because the expectations of the two groups of readers  are likely to be different. The corporates generally will require a great deal of detail and a more formal tone, whereas tradespeople are generally time-poor, so they want a shorter document which gets straight to the point and uses everyday language rather than jargon.

Who will be reading your Company Profile – and what are their expectations?

Mistake no. 2 – Being boring

Yes, a Company Profile is a business document, and generally requires a business-like tone, but it doesn’t have to be boring.

If you want people to read your profile, you need to ensure you include information they are looking for. Just think of some of the frequently asked questions you get from clients – and answer them!

You can also use colour in your headings, include charts and diagrams where relevant, and also include photos of your staff, vehicles and/or business premises where relevant.

How can you make your Company Profile interesting?

Mistake no. 3 – Not celebrating your achievements

It astounds me the number of companies who don’t celebrate their achievements. If you’ve been nominated for or won an award, achieving great sales growth or increased your customer base, these are just some of the things your readers want to know. Detailing these achievements demonstrates your commitment and shows that others are sharing in your success.

Do you have any achievements which can be celebrated in your profile?

Mistake no. 4 – Not using headings

Yes, this does seem obvious to most people, but there are some Company Profiles out there which contain paragraph after paragraph of text without any clear delineation between the topics discussed.

It’s a good idea to use bold and/or a larger sized font for your headings. You can also use colour to add interest by choosing one or more of your logo or corporate colours.

If you profile is more than 2-4 pages, you may also wish to include an index page to make it easier for the reader to find the information that is relevant to them.

Mistake no. 5 – Being too long-winded or too brief

Before writing your profile, you should consider the reason you’re writing it. If it’s for tender documents, what length of profile is expected – 1 page, 4 pages, 24 pages? This is an important consideration because you don’t want to put together a 24 page profile with loads of detail if the reader wants a brief single page summary document.

Same goes for the actual writing. There’s no need to waffle on too much about your organisation, just state the facts clearly and concisely. However, you need to be careful not to go the other way and not provide enough information for the reader to make an informed decision too. 

Mistake no. 6 – Not checking spelling, grammar and typos

This seems like a no-brainer, but the simple things like spelling, grammar and typos are often overlooked. Leave yourself enough time to get a co-worker, your spouse, a friend or your boss read through the document thoroughly so that you can make any last minute changes necessary before you submit it – or print multiple copies!

Mistake no. 7 – Bending the truth

Ah yes, bending the truth, otherwise known as “gilding the lily”, pumping things up a bit or fibbing. This is very unprofessional and it will deteriorate your brand if and when your clients or competitors find out you haven’t been truthful. We all want to appear to be a successful organisation. It’s important to be truthful about your capabilities.

 

So there you have it! With a little planning and attention to detail, you’ll benefit from knowing these 7 Company Profile mistakes to avoid.

 

Hi, I’m Lyndall Guinery-Smith, The Professional Writer. With a strong background in small business management I actually enjoy writing Company Profiles (as crazy as that sounds!).

I love to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line. I happily work with clients all round Australia. Email me to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

Real estate ad writing, property ad writing, property marketing, professional writer

How to write the best Real Estate ads – Tips from a professional

Want to know how to write the best Real Estate ads?

Getting results from your property marketing can be challenging at times. Many fledgling agents are thrown in at the deep end, told to write real estate ads – often without any prior experience and sometimes using questionable English.

Writing ad copy is such an important part of the job of a salesperson (or Personal Assistant), yet there are many who are not confident in their ability to accurately draw potential buyers through their way with words. Following are some great tips from a professional property copywriter with more than 20 years of Real Estate marketing experience.

Ask questions before you start

Rather than simply filling in the specifications of the home on the listing form, think about what a buyer may be looking for in the home. Before you write your ad, spend some time asking questions so that you have as much information about the property as you can gather. You may want to put together a sheet of questions that you take to each property inspection.

Interview the vendor

They know their home better than anyone else. Ask them so or all of the following questions (where appropriate):

  • What attracted you to the property when you bought it?
  • Can you give me a list of the things you love about living here?
  • What are your best memories in this home?
  • Why are you selling?
  • Have you made any improvements to the property? If so, what and when? Cost?
  • What do you see as the main selling points of the property?
  • Did you have any plans for the property and have they been approved?
  • What do you know about any future developments planned for the area?

While this can take some time to do, all the information you gather can help you with marketing the property, especially in writing the advertising materials and talking to prospective purchasers.

Talk to potential buyers

Now I realise that you’ll only be talking to potential buyers for this new listing after you’ve written the advertising material. When I say “talk to potential buyers”, I’m referring to buyers in general – at other nearby properties you may have Open for Inspection or you may be showing another property to.

Most buyers have done their homework on the area and are looking for a specific type of home. You could ask them:

  • What attracts you to this area?
  • What are you looking for in a home?
  • When two properties have the same no. of bedrooms and bathrooms, what do you think makes one better than the other?
  • How do you assess which properties are good value for money?

The purpose of asking these questions, and listening to the answers, is to tap into the buyer’s mindset and then try to write advertising copy which will appeal to their wants and needs.

Get to know the area you work in

  • Talk to the locals – shop owners are often a mine of information about what’s happening in the area. Ask them what’s going on.
  • Stay up-to-date with new developments in the area – talk to your local Council about proposed and approved developments. Most information is available for public access and comment.
  • Know the actual distance from the property to: All locals schools – primary, secondary, public & private, local shops, larger shopping centres, bus stops, train stations, recreational facilities such as parks, waterways and boat ramps, access to major arterial roads, hospitals and healthcare facilities, and any other services which buyers have on their wish list. Google maps is a great tool for this.

If you want to write real estate ads that stand out, and you’d like more tips on Real Estate copywriting, check out How to write Real Estate headlines that work.

If you have any questions, or you need the assistance of a professional real estate copywriter, please email me via my Contact Page.