Real estate copywriting tips, How to write a real estate ad, Property Copywriting tips, professional real estate copywriter, property writer

Top 5 Real Estate Copywriting Tips – from a Property Copywriting veteran

If writing property descriptions is challenging, check out these Real Estate copywriting tips.

Writing Real Estate advertisements can be difficult, particularly for those who are new to the industry. Following are some Real Estate copywriting tips from a Professional Property Copywriter with more than 20 years of industry experience.

1. Headlines are key

You only have a split second to attract the attention of your potential buyer, so make sure your headline has impact. What’s the most attractive thing about the property? Put it in the headline.

Boring: Three bedroom family home with pool

More interesting:  “Splash into summer “ or “Cool down in the pool” or “Your kids will love the pool”

Try writing at least three potential lines and see which one works best. Swap the words around if necessary. While your headline must stand out, make sure it’s truthful.

If you’re having trouble writing a headline, try writing the ad copy first, then write your headline. Or check out this article on writing headlines that stand out.

 

2. Features or benefits?

Features are factual yet boring, while it’s the benefits which attract buyers.

A feature is: A covered outdoor area.

A benefit is: Relax and dine in the comfort of your alfresco entertaining area.

Don’t just list the property’s features, highlight the benefits of living there.

 

3. It’s all about the lifestyle

These days, lifestyle is key. Tell the buyer why they will love the property. How will living there save them money? Give them more time with their family? Allow them to appreciate nature? Provide an opportunity to work from home?

Put them in the picture – “Imagine early morning walks on the beach, followed by breakfast on your expansive ocean view terrace.”

 

4. Target your audience

Who is likely to buy the property? Don’t say ANYONE! An apartment located up three flights of stairs is unlikely to appeal to retirees. Think about your target buyers and what they’re looking for in a home – address the ad to them.

For example, if you have a top floor apartment in a three-storey walk up, highlight the views, the location, the breezes you get or the fitness aspect – “Don’t mind stairs?” Sure, this will deter some people, but it’s better to narrow down the buyers with honesty than to attract them with false promises.

 

5. Use the space wisely

Whether you’re buying newspaper ad space or an internet listing, you’ll have limited room to write about the property. Most of the time, you can’t fit EVERYTHING about the property into the ad. You definitely shouldn’t list every single feature anyway (see point no. 2!).

While it’s important to mention the highlights, it’s also good to surprise the buyer with extras when they inspect the property. In fact, hinting at extras in the ad copy gives them a reason to attend the inspection.

 

Bonus tip – Get someone else to read your ad BEFORE you publish it. Consider their opinion and perhaps make some changes if necessary.

I hope these Real Estate copywriting tips have helped you. If you need a professional to help with your property descriptions, feel free to email me with your requirements.

 

Lyndall Guinery-Smith is The Professional Writer. She loves to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

Lyndall has a strong background in Real Estate and is a specialist Property Copywriter. She happily works with clients all round Australia. Email her to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

 

Help writing business article

Top 10 ideas for writing business articles

When you sit down to write an article for your company’s newsletter or blog, do you struggle to find ideas? Stop wasting your valuable time. Try one or more of the following tips from the toolkit of a Professional Writer.

1. Look at your FAQs What are the questions most frequently asked by your customers? Make a list and answer then. If you don’t already have an FAQ section on your website, the information you gather could form the basis of an FAQ page, as well as inspire an article on one or more of the questions.

2. Tell them what they don’t know For example, you could write, “10 things you need to know before selling your home”.  A title such as this often draws attention, as most people want to be sure they know as much as they can about a particular topic – especially when selling a home!

3. “How to” articlesRelate the article to one of your most popular products or services. Share the information you usually give to customers when they purchase from you, and add a little bit more if you can. This builds confidence in your prospects and may also reinforce your relationship with current customers.

4. Tap into your testimonials Hopefully you’ll already have some statements from happy customers. You can build an article around these, for example, “How we helped Bob catch a record-breaking fish”.

5. New products or services People often enjoy reading about innovative products or services. Be sure to detail how this can improve their life, for example, “How a revolutionary new printer cartridge helped business save 50% on their stationery bill”.

6. Interviews – Profile a trusted customer or top employee, detailing what they like most about your organisation, how you’ve helped them or the importance of their role in your business.

7. Current trendsLook at what’s going on in your industry or the wider business community at the moment. Is there a trend that people want or need to know more about?

8. Think about the season Whether it’s Christmas, Easter or Valentine’s Day, you can often find a way to link a product or service to the occasion. For example, “Top 10 quick and easy Christmas lunch ideas”.

9. Link to events – There are so many events throughout the year that you could link your product or service to, for example, “Top 6 training tips for your fun run”, or “How to have the best experience at Big Day Out”. Just take care not to detract from any charity events.

10. Share your experience – Think about some of the important lessons you’ve learned during your time in business. For example, you could write about, “What I learned in my first year in business” or “What I wish I’d known before I ran a marathon”.

I hope these prompts have got you thinking about writing your next business article. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to email me.

Still got “writer’s block”? Try this.

Hi, I’m Lyndall Guinery-Smith, The Professional Writer. I love to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

I have a strong background in Real Estate and I’m a specialist Property Copywriter. I also enjoy writing Company Profiles and Social Media/Blog content for all types of businesses, and happily work with clients all round Australia. Email me to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

 

Overcome writers block

The surefire solution to blog or newsletter writer’s block

Do you struggle to come up with content for your company Blog, eNews or print newsletter? You’re not alone. Whether you produce your newsletter weekly, monthly, quarterly or occasionally, the most common complaint amongst newsletter compilers is finding inspiration or knowing what to ‘fill it up with’.

Are you guilty of simply grabbing whatever you can find at the last minute, throwing it together and just sending the newsletter out? Unfortunately, this often results in boring your customers with meaningless drivel, or worse still, with customers seeing your newsletter as irrelevant and not even reading it – which is probably not the outcome you were hoping for!

Don’t despair! There’s one secret weapon most professionals use to ensure they always have a choice of quality information ready to use in each and every newsletter…. it’s… THE SWIPE FILE!

What’s a swipe file, I hear you ask? Well, it can be an actual folder or a folder on your computer, where you keep copies of articles from magazines, newspapers and website,s as well as story ideas, pictures or any information which may inspire a future article for your newsletter. Naturally, it goes without saying that if you wish to reproduce another person’s writing, you need to check on copyright issues. You’ll find most people are happy to have their work reproduced if you include their name, a bio/snippet of info about them (often found at the base of their original article) and a link back to their site or the location of the original article, but you need to get their permission to reproduce their work first.

If you’re confident in your own writing ability, you might prefer to take one aspect of the snipped article and expand upon that point in your own article. You can quote from the first article to reinforce your point.

Providing quality articles which are of interest to your customers helps to establish trust and builds your profile in their eyes. Make Writer’s Block a thing of the past… Start your swipe file today – I’m confident it will be a big help when you compile your next newsletter. If you’re already using a swipe file – share your tips and hints with us by leaving a reply in the comment box below.

 

Lyndall Guinery-Smith is The Professional Writer. She loves to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

Lyndall has a strong background in Real Estate and is a specialist Property Copywriter. She happily works with clients all round Australia. Email her to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

5 quick tips for article success

OK – so you’re keen to get an article published in your industry magazine, online journal or local newspaper. Most publications are happy to accept article submissions from your small business – as long as you have an interesting angle!   So, what’s the key to success?

Following are 5 quick tips to help you write an article the editor will love… and want to publish!

1 – Who’s your target market?

Let’s say you’re a freelance make-up artist. Your target market might be teenage girls who want professional makeup for their formal /graduation or young women who are potential brides, as well as their mothers.

If you coach kids after school, you’d target working parents who need help with getting their kids’ homework done or parents looking to improve their children’s academic results.

 2 – Where is your article being published?

Your story needs to capture the attention of this specific target audience. What type of publications or online media is your target market reading?  Approach these publications first.

If you’re really struggling to find an angle which fits your business, your target audience and the publication, you may need to approach a different publication.

3 – What does your audience want to know?

Consider what type of information your audience is looking for. What can you say that will elevate you to the level of expert in your field and influence them to call/email you to make an appointment or purchase your products? Think about the questions you frequently answer for your customers. Offer helpful information in your article –  they’ll want more.

4 – Keep it simple

Choose one angle per story. If your first story is of interest, there’s most likely going to be opportunities for further articles in the future, so save the other topics for later – or another publication.

5 – What’s your best angle?

Consider these potential angles as a starting point –

  • Is your business innovative or the first of its type in your community?
  • What specific problem do you solve for your clients?
  • How does your product/service help enhance client’s lives?
  • Do your products/services help clients save or make money?
  • Have you recently been nominated for, or preferably WON an award?
  • What’s your personal story/background – what led you to start the business?
  • Can you tie your business into something which is a current media issue?
  • What’s your point of difference? What’s your Unique Selling Proposition?
  • Listen to your current customers – why have they come to you and how have you helped them – Incorporate testimonials from your current and/or past clients to reinforce the point you are making. Testimonials are very powerful, but you must seek permission to publish the name and suburb of each person providing them.

5 powerful ways to get noticed … without breaking the bank

1.  Name tags – Do you have a name tag? Do your staff members have them? Have you noticed how people wearing name tags are often more approachable? By putting your name up front, you’re giving your customers a chance to get to know you and taking an important step towards them liking and trusting you too.  At networking events, having your own name tags can make it easier for people to remember you.

When you have the tags printed, your name needs to be in large bold type, so it’s easy to see. The tag should also include your business name, logo and/or corporate colours. Customised name tags are available at most specialty stationery shops.

2.   Uniforms – Similar to name tags, a uniform can convey your corporate image through colour and style. They can make you look more professional and also make you more memorable to customers, as well as portray a sense of unity and pride amongst your team.

Do your research and find a uniform which suits your business and personality. You don’t have to spend a fortune. Check with your accountant regarding the rules for tax deductibility on uniforms.

3.  Car stickers – Your own mobile billboard. You can choose to cover the entire vehicle in your branding, use the rear window as an advertisement, or print bumper stickers to share amongst your family, friends and customers. All are an excellent opportunity to grab the attention of potential customers and remind your existing customers to return.

4.   Brochures – Ask complementary businesses whether you can do a brochure swap, i.e. you display their brochures and they display yours. A brochure provides more information than a business card, and when written well, can influence your prospect to pick up the phone and call you!

5.   Business card with photo – Having your photo on your card helps people to remember you. A professional photo helps you look approachable too.

Got something you’d like to add to the list? If there’s a branding tip that’s worked for you, please let us know in the comments section below.

 

Lyndall Guinery-Smith is The Professional Writer. She loves to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

Lyndall has a strong background in Real Estate and is a specialist Property Copywriter. She happily works with clients all round Australia. Email her to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

7 ways to bring creative thinking alive in your business

 

Creative thinking is essential in today’s fast-paced business world. If you’re able to regularly tap into your creativity and come up with innovative new ideas, you’re likely to be streets ahead of your competition.

Here’s some suggestions to stimulate your creative thinking:

  • Teamwork – Get your team together (or gather friends and associates if you don’t have a team), take time out – away from all distractions – and brain storm! Firstly, come up with a list of issues you need to address, then one at a time, discuss each issue openly without dismissing any suggestions at first – explore every option.
  • Customer Focus – Take a close look at your current customers. Draw up a profile of your “typical” customer and assess how you serve them now. Think of ways you can serve them better – or ASK them how you can via a survey.
  • Meditate – Don’t knock it if you’ve never tried it! Get yourself a guided meditation to start. You can do just 10-15 minutes each day, focusing on one issue each time. It’s amazing what new ideas you can come up with.
  • Exercise – No, it’s not a dirty word. Exercise stimulates the body and brain, getting the blood and creative juices flowing. If you’re not into the gym or boot camp, just go for a walk in pleasant surroundings.
  • Do you have a hobby? Take time away from your business to get out into nature, do some gardening, paint, draw or take photos. These creative activities can stimulate your thinking within the business.
  • Get colourful – get out the paper and coloured pencils and draw a mind map by placing the issue in the centre of the page and exploring a range of options. Use a different colour for each option.
  • Study your competitors – Check out how they’re doing things. The idea is NOT to copy them, it’s to look closely at what they’re doing and work out how YOU can do it better, much better!

Once you’ve given any or all these ideas a try, please let me know how they helped you become more creative and bring that creativity alive in your business.

Also feel free to share an idea you have for exploring creativity in business. Happy creating!

 

Lyndall Guinery-Smith is The Professional Writer. She loves to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

Lyndall has a strong background in Real Estate and is a specialist Property Copywriter. She happily works with clients all round Australia. Email her to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

 

Attention – How to get your article published

Now that I’ve got your attention … let’s find out how you can attract more business with a targeted article or press release.

If you’re thinking of writing an article or press release about your business, you’re going to need a good story angle if you’d like your story published. Here are some suggestions:

  • Does your business help customers save time or money?
  • Do you help people plan for a family holiday or a better future?
  • Do you have a link to a current news story?
  • Is your business organic or green? (very topical and popular)
  • Did you business come to life out of a significant event in your life or someone else’s?
  • Do you have a celebrity customer?

Once you’ve settled on a story angle, you need to carefully consider your target market. A lot of business owners consider “everyone” to be their target market, but you really need to think about who your ideal customer is – perhaps its the person who spends often and regularly, then refers their family and friends to you. Think about your ideal customer’s specific needs. Are they young mothers or mature women? Do you work with people who are conscious of the environment or those who are interested in development? What ever their interests are, your article needs to connect with them and address their needs.

Now think about the publications your ideal customer reads or watches. You need to know whether they are reading so that you can target those particular websites or print publications with your article. Depending on your audience, you may also need to think about the tone of the language used in the article.

Targeting your article to the right audience is vital if you want your article published, read by customers and the final outcome … to bring more customers into your business.

 

Lyndall Guinery-Smith is The Professional Writer. She loves to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

Lyndall has a strong background in Real Estate and is a specialist Property Copywriter. She happily works with clients all round Australia. Email her to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

How to turn new customers into clients for life

I once read some great advice to business owners, ‘Tell them what you’re gonna do, tell them what you’re doing, then tell them what you’ve done.’  Wow, great advice!

Let’s face it, we all want to establish great relationships with our customers … and we know that communication is the key to achieving this.  Yet, one of the biggest complaints we hear from customers is about lack of communication.

Communicating with customers is not only vital, it’s usually fairly simple, low-cost and an effective way to stay top-of-mind with them. Yet, honestly, how often do you communicate with your customers? I’m not just talking about newsletters and blog posts, I mean one-on-one communication via personal letter, phone call, email or various other channels.

As small business owners, we usually have fewer customers than larger organisations, so we’re more likely to be able to provide that personal service and communication. This is one way to really set yourself apart from the competition.

Regular communication can help you to:

  • Get the job in the first place
  • Establish a great rapport with clients
  • Demonstrate the value of your service and justify your fees
  • Smooth out any misunderstandings/stop problems from arising
  • Convert customers to life-long clients… and
  • Get some referrals!

When working closely with a customer, imagine the impression you could make by keeping them regularly updated on the progress of your project? Think about implementing a system which incorporates progress reports, email updates, personal phone calls and the occasional visit to your customers (where appropriate). Depending on the size of your business and your budget, you could use a diary, computer database or customer relationship management (CRM) system to ensure ease of communications.

By regularly communicating with customers, you enhance the sense of connection and make them feel more valued, which in turn makes customers much more likely to become life-long clients.  So few small business owners do this well – so it will be easy to stand out from the competition.

Try it… then be sure to ask for some client feedback. You’ll see how communication can improve your bottom line.

 

Lyndall Guinery-Smith is The Professional Writer. She loves to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

Lyndall has a strong background in Real Estate and is a specialist Property Copywriter. She happily works with clients all round Australia. Email her to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

5 top tips to help get your business article published

You want to promote your business and attract more customers. You’ve done your research and found out that writing a press release or article is a great way to start the ball rolling.

Here are some tips to get you started:

  1. Know your market – Before you begin, you need to know exactly who your target market is, i.e. who will buy your products or services, then tailor the press release or article specifically to attract the attention of that target market.
  2. Where to publish – Once you know your market, you’ll need to find out where they get their information, i.e. do they read certain websites or publications? Where are you most likely to get their attention?
  3. Set the tone – Knowing your target market, are they more likely to relate to a formal, business-like tone or a more relaxed and friendly approach?
  4. Your story angle – To get the attention of an editor, you’ll need a good story angle – something that is of interest to their readers. Can you: Save them time, money or stress? Help them plan for a holiday, better future or family needs? Think about how you can help solve the reader’s problem.
  5. Research your publication – Contact the magazine, newspaper or website where you wish to publish your article and ask whether they take freelance submission or press releases before you start writing. If the answer is yes, ask them what their editorial guidelines are and make sure you stick to those rules when writing and submitting your article.

 

Lyndall Guinery-Smith is The Professional Writer. She loves to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

Lyndall has a strong background in Real Estate and is a specialist Property Copywriter. She happily works with clients all round Australia. Email her to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.

How to identify your UVP in 5 easy steps

As a customer, what makes you want to deal with one business over another when they both appear to offer the same product or service?  Some might say lower prices, but the vast majority of people want to receive:

  • Good customer SERVICE and…
  • VALUE for money, not just a low price.

It’s the combination of the service and value you provide to the customer which make up your Unique Value Proposition(UVP).  If you want to set yourself apart from your competition and win more business, it’s important to identify your UVP and then use it to streamline your marketing and increase sales.

Firstly, you need to be familiar with your target market, in particular, you need to identify who your ‘ideal customer’ is. Knowing your ideal customer and how you can address their specific needs and problems allows you to target your marketing, and provides a much greater chance of getting noticed by the people who will help increase your sales.

So, how do you identify your UVP?  Consider the following questions:-

1.  WIIFMWhat’s in it for me? What is the biggest benefit of your product or service, i.e. how does it solve your ideal customer’s problem/s, address a need, or improve their life?

2.  What’s unique – What do you offer your customers that is difficult to replicate? This might be the way you treat customers, your follow-up and customer contact system, your key people, the fact that you actually fulfil your promises, home delivery, etc…

3.  StrengthsWhat are the strengths of your business?

4.  Competitive edgeWhy would a customer buy from you rather than the competition?

5.  ASK – If you’re not sure of the answers to these questions, ASK your customers!

Let’s face it, the ultimate aim is for your business be your customer’s ONLY real choice. It’s helpful to answer the above questions for your own business, then do the same exercise on your competition.

Once you’ve established your UVP, you need to tell (or remind) all your current customers how you can address their needs or solve their problems, as they may not be familiar with your full range of your products or services. Reinforce this with a couple of strong testimonials that demonstrate how your product or service has helped overcome the customers’ problem.

It’s important to demonstrate HOW you can help customers, rather than simply telling them, ‘We also sell XYZ’.  You’ll find it’s more cost-effective and easier to sell an additional product or service to an existing customer than it is to attract a new one.

Feel free to let me know what your UVP is … perhaps I can feature you and your UVP in a future article. Drop me an email here. I look forward to hearing from you.

 

Lyndall Guinery-Smith is The Professional Writer. She loves to write copy dedicated to attracting and engaging your customers, and improving your bottom line.

Lyndall has a strong background in Real Estate and is a specialist Property Copywriter. She happily works with clients all round Australia. Email her to arrange an obligation-free discussion about your latest project.